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Tiger maple cupboard roared to $9,790 at Lincoln Way auction
By Pete Prunkl

BUCYRUS, Ohio — Thanks to Dionne Warwick we know the way to San Jose. But do you know the way to Bucyrus, Ohio? The central Ohio town is home to Lincoln Way Auction and auctioneer Terry Agin made sure anyone who attended his quarterly sales knew how to get there. Directions from every direction were on his website. Agin’s spacious gallery is south of Cleveland and north of Columbus and on Jan. 26 all roads led to Bucyrus.

This 400-lot sale was “like the old days,” said Agin. “Prices were good, onsite attendance was 150 and there was lots of action.” Like the 80s, this sale was free from internet interference. There were onsite, phone and absentee bidders, but no one in their pajamas was bidding from their laptop.

The sale’s top lot gave hope to those waiting for the furniture market to recover from the Great Recession. An elegant tiger maple cupboard that belonged in the dining room, not a country kitchen, was the star of the sale. With two glass doors above, two blind doors below and a small drawer in between, the stunning cupboard sold for $9,790. All selling prices include a 10 percent buyer’s premium.

Of the four reverse painted lamps in the sale, only one had a lighted shade and base and that shade was reason alone to travel to Bucyrus. The metalwork that divided the shade’s six glass segments came to a point at the rim giving it a batwing appearance. The attractive table lamp sold for $2,860.

A hanging lamp with at least 100 prisms, elaborate pierced metalwork, a little cup for burnt matches and a pair of superbly painted owls on the shade, easily made it to the sale’s top five. The massive lamp, now electrified, brought $1,815.

The sale featured dozens of fancy metal clocks that may have been the center piece for a mantel garniture. But the top clock was a circa 1880 Ansonia Crystal Palace clock with double statues on a walnut base under an arched dome. It sold for $1,980.

Glass, metal and wood were not the only materials that sold well. A plastic Pabst Blue Ribbon electric bar display sign from the 1960s came complete with an antique automobile with turning wheels and rocking chassis. It sold for $797.

There were a few bargains. A full-size brass bed sold for a mere $165. “Everyone wants new queen-sized beds,” said Agin. A Victorian upholstered loveseat and four chairs in excellent condition brought $385, an indication, said Agin, that young people today are not decorating with antique upholstered furniture. To check on the next sale at Lincoln Way Auction, visit their website at www.lincolnwayauction.com or call (419) 562-4363.

4/26/2020
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